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LAKEHEAD CALENDAR 2009-2010

Lakehead 2009-2010 Academic Courses Undergraduate Courses Physics
Physics Courses

Courses not offered this academic year (fall/winter terms) are indicated by the words "NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR" below the course description. Nevertheless, students should refer to the Timetable as a final check.

The following courses are offered for degree programs unless otherwise indicated.

Physics 1010      Introductory Applied Physics II (Electricity)
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: This is a non-calculus introduction to sound, electricity, and magnetism. Topics covered include wave motion, sound, the electric field, electric potential, direct current circuits, electrochemistry, the magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, and alternating current circuits.
Offering: 0-0; 3-2
Notes: Course designated primarily for Engineering Technology students, which may be taken for degree credit by students not majoring in Science.
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Physics 1030      Introductory Applied Physics I (Mechanics)
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: This is a non-calculus introduction to mechanics. Topics covered include vectors, statics, uniform accelerated motion, energy, momentum, uniform circular motion, simple machines, elasticity, and simple harmonic motion.
Offering: 3-2; 0-0
Notes: Course designated primarily for Engineering Technology students, which may be taken for degree credit by students not majoring in Science.
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Physics 1070      Semiconductors and Gases
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: Photoelectric effects, theory of semiconductors; thermionic emission and electron ballistics; properties of gases; kinetic theory of gases; gas discharge.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Physics 1101      Introductory Physics
Credit Weight: 1.0
Corequisite(s): Mathematics 1160 or 1180
Description: A calculus-based course intended for students in the physical sciences, applied sciences and mathematics which includes the study of Newtonian mechanics for particles and rigid bodies, gravitation, oscillations, mechanical waves and sound, electricity, D.C. and A.C. circuits, electromagnetic waves and the wave properties of light, accompanied by related laboratory work. Note:
Offering: 3-3; 3-3
Notes: Students may receive credit for only one of Physics 1101 or 1113/1133.
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Physics 1113      Introductory Physics for Life Sciences I
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: A non-calculus course primarily for students with an interest in biology, medicine or athletics. Topics include: two-dimensional motion; rotational motion; levers and torque; momentum and collisions; work and energy; oscillations; fluids; waves and sound. Note:
Offering: 3-3; 0-0
Notes: Students may receive credit for only one of Physics 1101 or 1113/1133.
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Physics 1133      Introductory Physics for Life Sciences II
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 1113
Description: This is a continuation of Physics 1113. Topics include: electricity and magnetism; electric circuits and nerves; light, optics, and optical instruments. Note:
Offering: 0-0; 3-3
Notes: Students may receive credit for only one of Physics 1101 or 1113/1133.
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Physics 2030      Meteorology II
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): General Science 1010, or Physics 1101, or Physics 1113 and 1133, or permission of the instructor
Description: A quantitative continuation of General Science 1010 emphasizing the physical processes underlying atmospheric phenomena. Topics include energy processes, the jet stream, cyclogenesis, and forecasting. Significant global issues involving the atmosphere (El Nino, global climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, air quality) are discussed from a meteorological perspective.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Notes: Only offered through Distance Education.
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Physics 2111      Analytical Mechanics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 1101
Corequisite(s): Mathematics 2111
Description: An in-depth study of Newtonian particle mechanics that involves extensive use of vector calculus and differential equations. The course begins with a review of vector algebra and the development of vector differentiation. Other topics include Newton's laws and rectilinear motion under non-uniform acceleration; undamped, damped, and forced harmonic motion; conservation and non-conservative force fields; rotating reference frames; Kepler's laws and planetary motion; and dynamics of systems of particles, collisions, and rocket motion.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Physics 2151      Thermodynamics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 1101
Description: Temperature, equations of state and phase diagrams, the first law of thermodynamics, the Carnot cycle, entropy and the second law, properties of a pure substance, other applications, Helmholtz and Gibbs functions, the Maxwell relations, chemical potential.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Physics 2211      Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 1101
Corequisite(s): Mathematics 2131
Description: Direct and alternating circuit theory is introduced with specific attention to Kirchhoff's laws, Thevenin's theorem, phasor notation (complex numbers), and transient analysis. This forms the theoretical basis of the laboratory part of the course. Electrostatics covers Coulomb's law, Gauss' flux theorem and the definition of the electric potential with an emphasis on vector and scalar fields. Electrostatic theory is applied to capacitors and dielectric materials. Magnetostatics covers calculations of the magnetic field and the Lorentz force using the Biot-Savart law and Ampere's circuital law. Finally, electrodynamics covers Faraday's law of induction with applications in mutual and self-inductance. This course requires a strong background in mathematics and some vector calculus.
Offering: 0-0; 3-3
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Physics 2311      Introduction to Optics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 1101 or 1113/1133
Description: Geometrical optics; reflection and refraction, thin lenses, thick lenses, aberrations, optical instruments. Physical optics. Huygen's principle, interference and diffraction, resolving power, polarization.
Offering: 3-3; 0-0
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Physics 2331      Modern Physics I
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 1101 or 1113/1133
Description: Relativity, the photon, the wave-particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation and matter; introduction to wave mechanics; the hydrogen atom and atomic line spectra; orbital and spin angular momenta.
Offering: 3-1; 0-0
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Physics 2332      Modern Physics II
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 2331
Description: A continuation of Physics 2331, covering the major areas of modern physics. Topics include: many-electron atoms; molecular structure; statistical physics; lasers; solid-state physics; nuclear physics.
Offering: 0-0; 3-1
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Physics 2410      Observational Astronomy
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 1101 or 1113/1133 or permission of the instructor
Description: Students are taught the practical use of the telescope and CCD detectors to find, track and image astronomical targets in the night sky, measure the light of stars, and determine the proper motion of celestial bodies. The basic theory of astronomical coordinate systems, time keeping, star charts, the optics of telescopes, atmospheric effects, CCD electronics, photometry, variable stars, astrometry, and spectroscopy will be covered. Several software packages for telescope control, data collection, and analysis will be introduced. This course will involve a hands-on project at the Thunder Bay Observatory scheduled outside of normal class time.
Offering: 3-1; 0-0
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Physics 2990      Co-op Work Term I
Credit Weight: 0.5
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Physics 3110      Nuclear Energy
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: See Division of Environmental Studies, Courses, Environmental Studies 3110, for full course description.
Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 3110
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Physics 3113      Quantum Mechanics I
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 2331
Description: Classical causality, Heinsenberg's principle, position and momentum determining experiments, wave packets and spread, electromagnetism, wave-particle duality, de Broglie particle-wave duality, matter waves, electron stability, Schr?dinger equation, boundary conditions, finite and infinite one-dimensional wells. Transmission and reflection coefficients. Introduction to simple harmonic oscillator and the hydrogen atom. Emphasis will be on applications of interest to physicists and chemists.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Physics 3211      Electromagnetic Theory
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 2211
Description: Topics covered include vector operators, electrostatic potential andforce, magnetostatics, Faraday's law of induction, laws relating changing electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's equations in integral and differential form, boundary conditions, electromagnetic radiation and energy propagation, Fresnel's equations, and basic antenna theory.
Offering: 3-1; 0-0
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Physics 3231      Introductory Electronics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 2211 or permission of the instructor
Description: The course begins with a rapid review of DC and AC circuit theory. Basic bipolar junction transistor circuits are then covered; such as the emitter follower, current sources and mirrors, the common emitter, push-pull, and differential amplifiers. A number of linear and non-linear operational amplifier circuits are examined with an emphasis on negative and positive feedback circuit analysis. Specialized amplifiers used as comparators, triggers, and oscillators are also examined. A quick overview of the field effect transistor, amplifier noise, and filter bandwidth rounds out the course. This is a laboratory intensive course.
Offering: 3-3; 0-0
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Physics 3311      Fibre Optic Communications
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 2311
Description: Basic fibre theory: types, modes, losses, dispersion, nonlinearities. Passive fibre devices: couplers, connectors, splices. Light sources: LED, solid state and semiconductor lasers. Active devices: modulators, amplifiers, and detectors. System noise: noise sources, eye diagrams, and bit error rate analysis. System design and local area networks.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Physics 3313      Computer Interfacing
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 3231
Description: Microprocessor register structure and instruction sets with attention given to the Z8 microcomputer. Assembly language programming examples. Examples of interfacing to memory and simple hardware types. Timer/counter applications. Chip select logic and bus interfacing. Microprocessor timing. A/D and D/A conversion with applications.
Offering: 0-0; 2-3
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Physics 3351      Nuclear Physics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 2331
Description: Radioactivity, nuclear models, forces and structure; alpha, beta and gamma rays, packing fractions and binding energy, particle detectors and accelerators, reactors, elementary particles.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Physics 3371      Solid State Physics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 2332
Description: Crystal structure, x-ray diffraction, dislocations, band theory, electrons and holes, statistics, junctions, thermionic emission.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Physics 3411      Computational Physics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: Computer simulation of problems in physics with emphasis on the physical content of the problems. Simulation topics will include: linear and nonlinear systems, dynamical chaos, dynamics of many-particle systems, electrodynamics, and quantum systems. The techniques applied will include: finite element method, fast fourier transform, interpolation, numerical quadrature, and difference equations.
Offering: 0-0; 2-4
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Physics 3511      Biological Physics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 1101 or 1113/1133
Description: The fundamental physics governing biological processes: Structure and function of membranes, transport, Fick's Laws and osmosis, electrical properties of cells, Hodgkin-Huxley model, structure and function of ion channels, structure and function of proteins, protein folding and aggregation, genomics and protenomics, bioinformatics, recent applications of experimental physics techniques to biology.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Physics 3611      Computer Acquisition and Control
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 3231
Description: This course will introduce techniques for making physical measurements using computer-based instrumentation. The course also acts as an introduction to the graphical programming language LabVIEW. This language finds wide application in physics (and other) disciplines, for computer-based data acquisition and control.
Offering: 0-0; 0-4
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Physics 3990      Co-op Work Term II
Credit Weight: 0.5
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Physics 3992      Co-op Work Term III
Credit Weight: 0.5
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Physics 4113      Classical Mechanics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 2111
Description: A detailed study of the motion of rigid bodies includes planar motion, impulse and collision, the inertia tensor, principal axes, and motion in three dimensions. Gyroscopic precission and nutation are examined in some detail using Eulerian angles. The second half of the course introduces Lagrangian mechanics, forces of constraint, and the Hamiltonian function. These are applied to the dynamics of coupled oscillating systems and the calculation of normal modes.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Physics 4115      Quantum Mechanics II
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 3113
Description: The course will include the following topics: Free particles and Fourier series, Dirac delta-function, vector spaces, axioms, Hermitian operators, uncertainty principle, destruction and creation operators for harmonic oscillators, angular momentum in three dimensions, ladder operators, central potentials, hydrogen atom, spin and the exclusion principle, stationary and time dependent perturbation theory.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Physics 4171      Statistical Mechanics and Thermal Physics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: Statistical methods and probability theory are reviewed, including the binomial, Gaussian, and Poisson distributions. These are applied to systems of particles, and the basic principles of statistical thermodynamics are developed. The concepts of generalized forces, work, heat reservoirs, temperature, entropy, heat capacity, internal energy, the classical ideal gas, partition functions, Gibbs paradox, effusion, the Boltzmann distribution, and the law of mass action are developed. Other topics covered include the Maxwell relations, the van der Waal gas, free and throttled gas expansion, heat engines, and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation (phase transformations). It is shown that statistical mechanics draws from most other branches of physics and mathematics.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Physics 4211      Electromagnetics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 3211
Description: Maxwell's equations, Fresnel's equations, the equation of continuity and Poynting vector applications are reviewed. Scalar and vector potentials, the gauge transformation, and the inhomogeneous wave equation are discussed. Retarded potentials with applications to dipole radiation, the half-wave antenna, directed arrays and the diffraction grating are introduced. Wave guide and transmission line theory are discussed. Lienard-Wiechert potentials are introduced and applied to radiation from an accelerated charge.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Physics 4277      Relativity
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: Galilean transformations. Special Relativity: Einstein's axioms, synchronization, spacetime diagrams, Lorentz transformations, and paradoxes. Relativistic Kinematics: velocity transformation, Doppler effect, and changes in shape. Spacetime geometry: four-vectors, causality, light cones, and transformation of four-vectors. Electromagnetism and Relativity: Maxwell's equations in four-vector form. Relativistic Dynamics: particle collisions, conservation laws, and invariance.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Physics 4311      Modern Optics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Physics 2311
Corequisite(s): Physics 3211
Description: The Maxwell equations; interaction of light with matter; Michaelson and Fabry-Perot interferometers; temporal and spatial coherence; lasers and beam propagation ; holography; Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction; diffraction gratings; Fourier optics; fiber optics.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Physics 4351      Nuclear Physics
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: Natural radioactivity, growth and decay of radioactive species. Nuclear properties, masses, stability, charge, radius, moments. Nuclear effects in spectroscopy. Nuclear models, radioactive decay processes. Nuclear reaction mechanisms, nuclear forces. Interaction of radiation and nuclear particles with matter. Nuclear detectors and measurement of energy and radiation intensity. Production of high-energy charged particles.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Physics 4411      Advanced Experimental Physics I
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: The experiments will be based on fourth year physics courses. Topics considered will include several of the following: x-ray diffraction and crystal structure determination, investigation of laser types and applications, and the use of dispersive and interferometric optical spectrometers.
Offering: 0-4; 0-0
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Physics 4412      Advanced Experimental Physics II
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: Experiments will be based on fourth year physics courses. Topics may include the following: nuclear instruments and methods, microcomputer based data collection and analysis, or optical and electrical investigation of materials.
Offering: 0-0; 0-4
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Physics 4501      Research Topic for Students in Physics
Credit Weight: 1.0
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: A research project, chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor, will be conducted under the supervision of that advisor. The student will prepare a thesis and present a Physics Department seminar.
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Physics 4611      Topics in Physics
Credit Weight: 05
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: A course with topics that may vary from year to year.
SpecialTopic: Y
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Physics 4990      Co-op Work Term IV
Credit Weight: 0.5
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Physics 4992      Co-op Work Term V
Credit Weight: 0.5
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