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LAKEHEAD CALENDAR 2009-2010

Lakehead 2009-2010 Academic Courses Undergraduate Courses Anthropology Courses
Anthropology Courses

Courses not offered this academic year (fall/winter terms) are indicated by the words "NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR" below the course description. Nevertheless, students should refer to the Timetable as a final check.

Science/Arts Credit
The following courses are acceptable for either Science or Arts credit. Anthropology courses not specified here are Arts credits only:

Anthropology 1032 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology
Anthropology 2110 - Biology of Human Variation
Anthropology 2112 - Human Evolution
Anthropology 2114 - Anthropology of Sex
Anthropology 2137 - Archaeology
Anthropology 2151 - Ancient People and Places
Anthropology 2173/Indigenous Learning 2173 - The Archaeology of North America
Anthropology 3010 - Fundamental of Geoarchaeology
Anthropology 3113 - Bioanthropology of Aging
Anthropology 3118 - Scientific Applications in Archaeology
Anthropology 3136 - Forensic Anthropology
Anthropology 3138 - Introduction to DNA Molecular Methods
Anthropology 3139 - Molecular Anthropology
Anthropology 3150 - Introduction to Zooarchaeology
Anthropology 3231 - Historical Archaeology
Anthropology 3315 - Archaeology of the Boreal Forest
Anthropology 3455 - Stable Isotopes in Bioanthropology
Anthropology 3815 - Special Topic I with Laboratory
Anthropology 3817 - Special Topic II with Laboratory
Anthropology 4111 - Ecological and Environmental Anthropology
Anthropology 4114/Environmental Studies 4114 - Human Impacts on the Environment
Anthropology 4219 - Human Skeletal and Dental Biology
Anthropology 4417 - DNA in Forensic Science
Anthropology 4419 - Ancient DNA
Anthropology 4429 - Ancient DNA Internship
Anthropology 4430 - Molecular Paleopathology
Anthropology 4450 - Forensic and Archaeological Microscopy
Anthropology 4503 - Advanced Archaeology
Anthropology 4505 - Advanced Biological Anthropology
Anthropology 4901 - Honours Thesis
(on topics in Biological Anthropology or Archaeology)
Anthropology 0300      Introduction to Language
Credit Weight: 1
Cross-List(s): Linguistics 0300
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Anthropology 1032      Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: A general introduction to biological anthropology and archaeology. The course covers topics ranging from the biological origin of humans, the appearance of human culture, and the rise of civilization.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Anthropology 1034      Introduction to Socio-Cultural Anthropology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: A general introduction to social and cultural anthropology, that includes the direct observation and analysis of the dynamics of ‘living cultures’ from around the world.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Anthropology 2110      Biology of Human Variation
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1032 and 1034 or permission of the instructor Anthropology 1032 or permission of the instructor
Description: This course focuses on human microevolution. Topics include evolutionary theory, the genetic background of human variation, human adaptability and the role of disease in human evolution.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
Notes: Students who have taken Anthropology 2106 previously may not take Anthropology 2110 for credit.
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Anthropology 2112      Human Evolution
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2110 or permission of the instructor
Description: The field of paleoanthropology is examined in this course. Students are introduced to comparative primate biology, including behaviour, as a background to examining the fossil evidence for human evolution.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Notes: Students who have taken Anthropology 2106 previously may not take Anthropology 2112 for credit.
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Anthropology 2114      Anthropology of Sex
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: The biological basis of human reproduction and sexual behaviour is covered in this course. Topics include human reproductive anatomy and physiology, the genetics of human reproduction and the evolution of human sexuality. The data are organized in an evolutionary framework.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
Notes: Students who have taken Anthropology 2107 previously may not take Anthropology 2114 for credit.
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Anthropology 2116      Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: After a brief introduction to the anthropological approach, different cultural interpretations of gender roles and abilities are discussed. Homosexuality will be examined cross-culturally. How some human societies organize sexual differences by assigning work roles and other activities is also reviewed. Societies at various technological levels will be used as examples. This includes forager, horticultural, pastoral, agricultural, and industrial societies, specifically in Scandinavia, Japan, Russia and Canada.
Cross-List(s): Women's Studies 2116
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Anthropology 2137      Fundamentals of Archaeology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1032 or permission of the instructor
Description: An introduction to modern archaeological methods. Topics include: chronometric dating, archaeological survey and excavation techniques, artifact analysis, environmental archaeology (archaeobotany, geoarchaeology and zooarchaeology), ethnoarchaeology, social archaeology, cognitive archaeology, and the archaeology of ethnicity.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Anthropology 2151      Ancient Peoples and Places
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: An overview of Old and New World archaeology, with particular emphasis on the development of humans and culture from hunting/gathering to agricultural and ancient urban societies in Mesoamerica, Europe, Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and China.
Offering: 0-0, 3-0
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Anthropology 2173      The Archaeology of North America
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1032 and 1034 or permission of the instructor
Description:

An examination of the transformation and adaptation of ancient Aboriginal cultures of Canada and the USA using archaeological recoveries to aid interpretation.


Cross-List(s): Indigenous Learning 2173
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 2332      Peoples and Cultures of Africa
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: Addresses a range of African cultures, and reviews their diversity and complexity. Traditional Africa culture still continues, and knowledge of this heritage is vital to understand contemporary change and recent events.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 2401      Introduction to Native Canadian Studies
Credit Weight: 1
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1032 and 1034 or permission of the instructor
Description: This course focuses on an analysis of the customs and cultures of the aboriginal peoples of Canada from the time they entered the New World to the present. The course begins with an examination of the migration of Native People to the New World, traces the impact of Europeans on Native societies and deals with some of the key issues that confront Native Canadians today.
Cross-List(s): Indigeous Learning 2401
Offering: 3-0; 3-0
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Anthropology 2515      Key Concepts in Socio-Cultural Anthropology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1034 or permission of the instructor
Description: The descriptive and analytical study of contemporary societies; introduces key anthropological concepts, methods, and theories that inform us about the nature and diversity of human culture.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Anthropology 2517      Introducing Ethnography
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): A half-course in Anthropology or permission of the instructor
Description: A continuation of Anthropology 2515 that examines how ethnographers study cultures. This examination includes how different societies organize themselves, educate their young, enforce rules and customs, redistribute goods and services, and adapt to new situations.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Anthropology 2811      Special Topic I
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor
Description: A half course on a selected topic in anthropology.
SpecialTopic: Y
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 2813      Special Topic II
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor
Description: A half course on a selected topic in anthropology.
SpecialTopic: Y
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 3010      Geoarchaeology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2137 or permission of the instructor
Description: An introduction to geoarchaeology as a contextual framework for human paleoecology. Major topics include description and interpretation of sediments in which archaeological remains are found, consideration of the natural processes that create the archaeological record, and reconstruction of landscapes on which ancient people lived. Also addressed are: climate change, and the effects of these changes on biota; dating methods in archaeology; and geological sourcing techniques.
Offering: 2-3; or 2-3
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Anthropology 3113      Bioanthropology of Aging
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor
Description: This course examines the changes of the human body throughout the growth process from birth to old age. It uses a systems approach for the documentation and evaluation of the normal and variant patterns of biological growth found in human populations. It emphasizes the biology of old age and its unique problems (osteoporosis).
Cross-List(s): Gerontology 3113
Offering: 2-1; or 2-1
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Anthropology 3118      Scientific Applications in Archaeology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2137 or permission of the instructor
Description: The detailed study of archaeological sites and materials with an emphasis on methods for understanding human relationships with the environment. Specific topics include the analysis of site sediments, remote sensing, archaeological reconnaissance, and map production and interpretation.
Offering: 2-3; or 2-3
Notes: Students who have taken Anthropology 3001 previously may not take Anthropology 3118 for credit.
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Anthropology 3136      Forensic Anthropology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: This course examines the role of biological anthropology within the forensic sciences. It uses a case study approach to illustrate the procedures and responsibilities of bioanthropologists in the legal setting. Topics include the recovery of evidence from the crime scene, methods of skeletal and biochemical analysis (including DNA), and the role of the scientific expert in court.
Offering: 2-1; or 2-1
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Anthropology 3138      Introduction to DNA Molecular Methods
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Biology 2910 and one of Anthropology 2110, Biology 2171, Biology 2230, Chemistry 1210, or permission of the instructor
Description: An introduction to methods used in molecular biology, biochemistry and molecular anthropology with emphasis on the techniques and their application. The laboratory component covers the analysis of nucleic acids particularly DNA, and includes basic techniques such as gel electrophoresis, DNA extraction, and the polymerase chain reaction. Methods of DNA data analysis and interpretation are also introduced, including forensic science, molecular anthropology, molecular biology and molecular archaeology.
Cross-List(s): Biology 3138
Offering: 2-1; or 2-1
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Anthropology 3139      Molecular Anthropology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 3138 or permission of the instructor
Description: An advanced study in Molecular Anthropology and Human Population Biology that addresses methods applied to the molecular study of humans and human evolution, human diversity, population movements and forensic identification. Also covers molecular taphonomy and biomolecules in the field of Molecular Anthropology.
Cross-List(s): Biology 3139
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 3150      Introduction to Zooarchaeology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2137 or permission of the instructor
Description: An introduction to comparative vertebrate osteology and its application to archaeology. Such studies are used to infer past dietary preferences, subsistence activities, butchering patterns, seasonal rounds, social organization, environmental reconstruction, animal domestication and status differentiation. The lab section provides basic training in element and species identification.
Offering: 2-3; or 2-3
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Anthropology 3231      Historic Archaeology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2137 or permission of the instructor
Description: A study of archaeological methods as they are applied to societies with a written historic tradition. The discussion focuses on the archaeology of the fur trade in Canada and the northern U.S.A. It considers the theoretical and methodological development of the discipline, and introduces methods of identifying technologies reflecting innovations over the last 500 years.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 3238      History of Ethnology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1034
Description: The history of ethnology, the study of contemporary cultures and those of the recent past. The life and works of renowned ethnologists such as Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, and Claude L?vi-Strauss will be highlighted.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Notes: Students who have taken Anthropology 3218 previously may not take Anthropology 3238 for credit.
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Anthropology 3312      Medical Anthropology I
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2515 and 2517 or permission of the instructor
Description: The course critically discusses the influence of culture on western medicine in a historical perspective. In order to offer a point of contrast, a variety of indigenous (Chinese, Ayurveda, and Shamanism) and alternative healing methods (Rolfing, Acupuncture, Reiki, and Therapeutic Touch) are reviewed.
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
Notes: Students who have taken Anthropology 3320 previously may not take Anthropology 3312 for credit.
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Anthropology 3315      Archaeology of the Boreal Forest
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2173 or permission of the instructor
Description: A review of the archaeological study of pre-contact Aboriginal cultures of the Canadian boreal forest. Of special interest are the socio-economic adaptations of hunters and gatherers to the ecology of the northern forests. While northern Ontario is of central concern, other archaeological cultures throughout the Canadian subarctic are considered.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 3317      Medical Anthropology II
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 3312 or permission of the instructor
Description: This course is based on an ecological perspective which views a community's health as a reflection of the nature of its adaptation to its environment. Factors such as religious beliefs, subsistence patterns, diet, stress, and modernization all are considered when discussing the overall health of groups of peoples. Examples are drawn from all parts of the world.
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Notes: Students who have taken Anthropology 3320 previously may not take Anthropology 3317 for credit.
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Anthropology 3455      Stable Isotopes in Bioanthropology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2110 and 2112 or permission of the instructor
Description: Introduction to the bioanthropological application of stable isotopes and other biochemical, geochemical and ecological techniques. Various stable isotopes (including C, N, O, S, H, Sr) can be used in the assessment of paleo-diet, life history and migratory patterns, to infer paleo-ecological contexts, and also in forensic applications.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 3534      Visual Anthropology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1034
Description: Feature and documentary films are used to examine the ways in which selected peoples of the world organize their social, economic, political, and spiritual affairs.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 3711      Kinship and Marriage
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2515 and 2517 or permission of the instructor
Description: This course focuses on understanding social organization based on kinship and marriage. This includes descent and residence rules, forms of marriage, preferred marriage partners, marriage alliances and different kinship systems. Students will learn to interview informants, draw kinship diagrams, and analyze different kinship systems. Various theoretical approaches will be critically examined.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 3733      Social Organization
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2515 and 2517 or permission of the instructor
Description: This course discusses political organization in cross-cultural perspective and critically questions the necessity for political leaders and assumptions regarding the superiority of modern democracy. Ethnographic examples are reviewed, including egalitarian societies, people without formal governments, and more stratified societies with age set organizations, chiefdoms, states and caste systems.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 3811      Special Topic I
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: A half course on a selected topic in anthropology.
SpecialTopic: Y
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
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Anthropology 3813      Special Topic II
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: A half course on a selected topic in anthropology.
SpecialTopic: Y
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
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Anthropology 3815      Special Topic I with Laboratory
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: A half course on a selected topic in archaeology or biological anthropology.
SpecialTopic: Y
Offering: 2-2; 0-0
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Anthropology 3817      Special Topic II with Laboratory
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: A half course on a selected topic in archaeology or biological anthropology.
SpecialTopic: Y
Offering: 0-0; 2-2
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Anthropology 4111      Ecological and Environmental Anthropology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): One FCE in Anthropology at the third year level or permission of the instructor
Description: This course explores theoretical issues relating to the integration of human beings into complex ecosystems. These human/environment relationships are reviewed in terms of the development of theoretical models from the mid 18th century up to the late 20th century.
Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 4111
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Notes: Students who have taken Anthropology 4001 previously may not take Anthropology 4111 for credit.
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Anthropology 4114      Human Impacts on the Environment
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2137 or permission of the instructor. Anthropology 3010 is recommended.
Description: It has become increasingly apparent that human society is capable of profoundly altering natural ecosystems. Although the scale of human impact on the environment has increased over the last 100 years, the present condition of the earth's ecosystems is the result of a long history of human-environmental interactions. Archaeology and other historical sciences play a central role in understanding the long-term effects of our species on the earth. The course provides an opportunity to explore this topic through a discussion of the recent literature.
Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 4114
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 4219      Human Skeletal and Dental Biology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2110, and either 3136 or 3150, or permission of the instructor
Description: A comprehensive study of human osteology and dental anatomy.  The lab focuses on both normal and variational anatomy.
Offering: 3-3; or 3-3
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Anthropology 4417      DNA in Forensic Science
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 3139/Biology 3139 or permission of the instructor
Description: An examination of the role of DNA analysis in the court systems of Canada and the United States. An overview of the recent history of DNA analysis and its role as evidence, and of the debate challenging the credibility of DNA evidence. The scientific basis of DNA analysis (both nuclear and mitochondrial), including variant techniques such as DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP's) are explained. The continuity of evidence from crime scene to court room, as well as statistical methods, are covered in detail.
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Anthropology 4419      Ancient DNA
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 2110, 2112 and 3138, and one full course equivalent in Biology, or permission of the instructor
Description: An advanced study of ancient and degraded DNA. The course content covers the history of the field, including a history of methodological development. The course also covers critical aspects in the field of ancient DNA such as DNA damage and problems associated with its study, including authentication and verification of ancient and degraded DNA results, followed by literature and case studies pivotal to the field and its development.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 4429      Ancient DNA Internship
Credit Weight: 1
Description: An intensive three week laboratory-based DNA course designed to teach students the fundamentals of DNA extraction, amplification (using PCR), sequencing and interpretation. Training in the latest DNA technologies, including the ABI 310 and 3100 automated sequencers. The course is team-taught and lectures on aDNA are interspersed with laboratory work to provide a theoretical component to the program.
Notes: A limited enrolment course. Additional laboratory fees are associated with this course.
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Anthropology 4430      Molecular Paleopathology
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 3138/Biology 3138 or permission of the instructor
Description: An advanced course in the genetic identification of disease in the past. The course covers the methods and techniques employed in the identification of disease, including parasitic, bacterial, viral and hereditary diseases. Case studies will be presented to demonstrate the methods and techniques and their application to archaeology, and evolutionary and medical biology.
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
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Anthropology 4450      Forensic and Archaeological Microscopy
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: Microscopic, chemical and biochemical techniques for the characterization of different types of organic trace materials and residues. Interpretation of the forensic and archaeological trace evidence, including fibres, hair, blood residues or stains, plant residues, plant microfossils, pollen and biological debris. A laboratory component is included for the hands on analysis of archaeological and forensic material.
Offering: 2-1; or 2-1
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Anthropology 4501      Advanced Cultural Anthropology
Credit Weight: 1
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: This course is intended for the student majoring in Anthropology at the honours level. The course will deal with selected topics in socio-cultural, medical, or applied anthropology at an advanced level.
Offering: 3-0; 3-0
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Anthropology 4503      Advanced Archaeology
Credit Weight: 1
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: This course is intended for the student majoring in Anthropology at the honours level. The course will deal with selected topics in archaeology at an advanced level.
Offering: 3-0; 3-0
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Anthropology 4505      Advanced Biological Anthropology
Credit Weight: 1
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department
Description: This course is intended for the student majoring in Anthropology at the honours level. The course will deal with selected topics in biological or biomedical anthropology at an advanced level.
Offering: 3-0; 3-0
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Anthropology 4517      Society, Culture and Nature
Credit Weight: 0.5
Description: See Department of Sociology, Courses, SOCI 4517, for full course description.
Cross-List(s): Sociology 4517/Environmental Studies 4517
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Anthropology 4901      Honours Thesis
Credit Weight: 1
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department and a minimum B (70%) overall average in third year level Anthropology courses
Description: Recommended for students considering graduate work in sociocultural anthropology, biological anthropology or archaeology. See Notes under HBA and HBSc programs for preparatory work to be done by the end of third year. The thesis may be on any topic approved by the student's advisor and may entail field and/or laboratory work, as well as library research.
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